Rogueish

08/18/14

(Source: hurwitzs)

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08/14/14

JMW Turner, “Barge on the River, Sunset” (c. 1806-7).

Thinking of climate change and giant robots reminded me of the tenderness towards human fragility and insignificance in Turner’s paintings, a pathos of distance born from the attempt to imaginatively occupy the position of nature’s own vast remorselessness.

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We Need to Stop Killer Robots from Taking Over the World | VICE United States

08/14/14

I guess imagining that we’ll all be murdered by robots is a comforting alternative to thinking about what the inevitable slow grind of climate change is going to do to the world. And worrying about AI flatters the human ego in a way environmental catastrophe doesn’t: imagine, these superintelligent beings, caring so much about human beings that they intentionally dedicate themselves to wiping us out!

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In Montmartre: Picasso, Matisse and Modernism in Paris 1900-1910 – review

08/10/14

The pictures and video of the Wright brothers’ first flight look so of their time - that is to say, old - that I don’t think I’d ever really got a sense of how extraordinarily new it must have felt to suddenly be living in a world in which people could fly, until this aside sparked my imagination.

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08/08/14

My love of images - mesquite flowering, the wind, Ehécatl, whispering its secret knowledge - and words, my passion for the daily struggle to render them concrete in the world and on paper, to render them flesh, keeps me alive.

― Anzaldúa, Borderlands / La Frontera

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08/08/14

By means of the breach of philosophical identity, a breach that amounts to addressing the truth to itself in an envelope, to hearing itself speak without opening its mouth or showing its teeth, the bloodiness of a disseminated writing comes to separate the lips, to violate the embouchure of philosophy, putting its tongue into movement, finally bringing it into contact with some other code, of an entirely other kind. A necessarily unique event, nonreproducible, hence illegible as such and, when it happens, inaudible in the conch, between earth and sea, without signature.

― Derrida, “Tympan”

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'Majesty, Vehemence, Splendor' by Andrew Butterfield

08/08/14

Veronese’s style is overtly rhetorical. In the Renaissance, painting was often said to be a form of mute poetry, but Veronese’s first biographer, Carlo Ridolfi, writing in 1646, instead compared his art to oratory. This comment may appear to emphasize the artificial, ceremonial, and unnatural qualities of Veronese’s art. But it was meant as praise: in the Renaissance, rhetoric was seen as the foundation of the humanities. It is striking to note that in 1557, the year after he published the first Italian edition of his commentary on Vitruvius, Daniele Barbaro also published a treatise about literature and rhetoric called On Eloquence. There he praises grandezza as the highest and most sublime style, appropriate for the most elevated topics. The elements he names as the main components of grandezza—majesty, vehemence, splendor, vivacity—read almost like a list of the qualities of Veronese’s art.

I’ve been thinking recently about the “linguistic turn” in philosophy, and how language sometimes gets framed in opposition to the material and the affective. Classical rhetorical theory is a nice reminder of the contingency of this distinction - we can instead imagine a phenomenology of language in which language is itself majestic, vehement, splendid, and vivacious.

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Face Me, I Face You

08/03/14

While he was still alive, Elizabeth’s father Henry VIII bought a 700-ton ship called The Jesus of Lubeck, whichElizabeth inherited. By 1564 she’d heard about the success of early slaving expeditions and decided to lend the ship Jesus to a man called John Hawkins who sailed to West Africa where he “got into his possession partly by sworde and partly by other meanes to the number of 300 negroes.” In Sierra Leone he managed a further 500. That Elizabeth I had so much to do with the sight of a ship namedJesus bearing down on West African shores is a fact that should be better known. In 1568, the Queen presented John Hawkins with a coat of arms. The design pictured an enslaved African person, to reflect the trade in humans Hawkins had pioneered.

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Vin Diesel on Guardians of the Galaxy: 'I didn't realise how much I love trees'

08/03/14

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08/02/14

witchblues:

Another conversation threw up a fascinating image: “During our regular night shifts, the general manager used to be abrasive with any worker he saw dozing. He used to take punitive action against them. One night, one hundred and eight of us went to sleep, all together, on the shop floor. Managers, one after the other, who came to check on us, saw us all sleeping in one place, and returned quietly. We carried on like this for three nights. They didn’t misbehave with us, didn’t take any action against us. Workers in other sections of the factory followed suit. It became a tradition of sorts.”
Faridabad Mazdoor Samachar (Faridabad Workers’ News), May 20141

[…]

Kumbhakarna, a warrior in the Sanskrit epic Ramayana, is remembered for his ravenous appetite, enormous strength, ethical doubts (he did not want to fight in a needless war, but did so when pressed, out of duty and loyalty), and his preference (given to him as a boon) for hibernating half the year away.

The Kumbhakarna Proposition is a proposal to recognize the revolutionary potential of the cultivated hibernation of a reticent strength, whose awakening has consequences. Like Kumbhakarna’s prowess, which some attribute to his preference for sleep over wakefulness, the radical move may derive its strength from gestation. To assert, propose, or desire seduction into a long period of invisible ferment may be seen as a wager to linger or loiter over thinking, as opposed to making haste for the purposes of execution. This is the time to dream lucidly. To envision and realize the things that one cannot do when one is awake, distracted, bored, busy. This is the time for hearing voices, to become open to the murmur of the universe, for heresy, for audacious conversations, for acts to turn factories into orchards, and a laughter that makes standing armies into brass bands.

"Is the World Sleeping, Sleepless, or Awake or Dreaming?" —Raqs Media Collective

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